Physician

Accordant and Physicians

At Accordant, we are committed to supporting you and your participating patients between office visits.

  • We provide education, focusing specifically on the issues that are of most concern to your patients, while monitoring for potential complications.
  • We discuss key elements of your treatment plan.
  • We address issues of motivation and behavioral skills that could hinder treatment plan compliance.
  • We work with patients to help them access community resources, like transportation to appointments.
  • We suggest strategies for implementing and following your plan.
  • We provide information regarding disease complications and side effects of medications.
  • We encourage your patients to notify you of concerns and potential complications, including appointment assistance where necessary.
  • We support patients in effectively communicating their concerns, and assist in coordinating services such as home care assistance and durable medical equipment needs.

Our program is based on the expertise of the physician specialist as the cornerstone of an effective treatment plan for complex, chronic conditions. We have engaged nationally recognized physician specialists from the very beginning, developing our program activities with their input and the best available medical evidence. We have taken these steps to ensure that best practices are the foundation of our interaction with your patients and your plan of care. Our program goals have always included strengthening the patient-physician relationship through supportive interventions. We trust that your participating patients will continue to see the benefit of that relationship as they live day to day.

Accordant is a trusted business associate of employers and health plans that provides health care support to patients who have one or more of the following conditions:

Epilepsy (Seizure)

Epilepsy (Seizure)

It is estimated that 2.3 million Americans have epilepsy disorders, which occur when normal brain activity is interrupted by intense bursts of electrical energy. Epilepsy may cause convulsions or loss of consciousness.

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid Arthritis

RA is an autoimmune disease characterized by the inflammation and subsequent degeneration of joint tissues, resulting in pain, stiffness and limitation of motion.

Human Immunodeficiency Virus

Human Immunodeficiency Virus

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a sexually transmitted infection that damages the immune system. This in turn raises the risk for other infections. Without treatment over a course of years, HIV can develop into AIDS, a chronic and potentially life-threatening disease.

Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple Sclerosis

MS is a chronic disorder of the central nervous system that affects more than 130,000 people in the United States. Symptoms may include visual and/or speech impairment, weakness, numbness or tingling of the limbs, and dysfunction of the bladder and bowel.

Crohn's Disease

Crohn's Disease

Crohn's disease is a painful, debilitating, chronic inflammation of the digestive track that causes severe diarrhea, bleeding and pain. The disease affects people of all ages.

Ulcerative Colitis

Ulcerative Colitis

UC produces microscopic ulcerations in the colon's inner lining, resulting in bloody diarrhea as a primary symptom. In addition, people with UC often experience abdominal pain and cramping, rectal pain, and anemia.

Parkinson's Disease

Parkinson's Disease

Parkinson's disease is a chronic progressive disease characterized by the loss of dopamine in the brain, resulting in tremors, impaired coordination, and stiffness of the limbs and trunk. Approximately 50,000 Americans are diagnosed each year.

Systemic Lupus
Erythematosus (SLE or Lupus)

Systemic Lupus
Erythematosus (SLE or Lupus)

Lupus is a chronic autoimmune disease that affects primarily females, most commonly in African-Americans, and causes inflammation of various parts of the body, particularly the skin, joints and kidneys.

Myasthenia Gravis

Myasthenia Gravis

Myasthenia gravis is a chronic neuromuscular disease characterized by weakness and rapid fatigue of muscles that affects an estimated 1 in 20,000 people in the United States alone.

Sickle Cell Disease

Sickle Cell Disease

It is estimated that 50,000 Americans are affected by sickle cell disease, a genetic disorder characterized by the production of "sickle shaped" red blood cells.

Hereditary Angioedema*

Hereditary Angioedema

Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare genetic condition that causes attacks of swelling in different parts of the body, including the hands, feet, genitals, stomach, face, and/or throat. Attacks can be unpredictable and usually last 2-5 days.

Cystic Fibrosis

Cystic Fibrosis

Cystic fibrosis is a chronic, inherited disorder that affects substance-secreting glands, especially mucous-producing glands, and creates pulmonary/respiratory problems, gastrointestinal problems and sweat gland problems.

Hemophilia

Hemophilia

Hemophilia is a rare inherited blood disorder that prevents or inhibits the blood's ability to clot. It affects approximately 20,000 males in the United States.

Scleroderma

Scleroderma

Scleroderma, or "hard skin," is a rare chronic disease caused by excess amounts of a protein called collagen. It causes a thickening or hardening that affects the skin, joints, blood vessels and internal organs. Scleroderma is about four times more prevalent in women than in men.

Polymyositis

Polymyositis

Polymyositis is part of a group of muscle diseases involving an inflammation and a slow, gradual breakdown of skeletal muscle tissue in the limbs and neck. Difficulty swallowing is common. High doses of steroids and immunosuppressant drugs are used for treatment.

Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating
Polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP)

Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating
Polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP)

CIDP is a neurological disorder characterized by progressive weakness and impaired sensory function in the legs and arms. It can occur at any age, but is more common in young adults and more prevalent in men than in women.

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
(also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease)

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

Also called "Lou Gehrig's Disease," ALS is a progressive and fatal neuromuscular disease that attacks nerve cells and pathways in the brain and spinal cord. More than 5,000 Americans are diagnosed with ALS each year.

Dermatomyositis

Dermatomyositis

Dermatomyositis produces a patchy, dusky, reddish or purple rash on the eyelids, cheeks, bridge of the nose, back or upper chest, elbows, knees and knuckles, with associated muscle weakness and difficulty swallowing. It is more prevalent in females than in males.

Gaucher Disease

Gaucher Disease

Gaucher disease is a rare genetic enzyme deficiency disorder that affects 10,000 to 20,000 Americans and costs up to $400,000 per year for enzyme replacement therapy. It is potentially fatal and is characterized by anemia, low platelet counts, severely enlarged liver and spleen, and bone disease.

*NCQA status planned